Tree nuts could help reduce markers of metabolic syndrome

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Eating tree nuts could help minimize your risk of developing metabolic syndrome, according to researchers from St. Michael's Hospital.

Metabolic syndrome is a group of risk factors that increase the likelihood of diabetes, stroke and heart disease.

The study found that eating about 50 grams of nuts a day - or about one and a half servings - was linked to a "modest decrease" in blood fats and blood sugars. But the subjects also didn't experience adverse effects from eating more nuts, which are high in calories and fat.

The most benefits were seen when patients swapped refined carbohydrates or saturated fats for tree nuts.

Peanuts don't count

Tree nuts include almonds, Brazil nuts, chestnuts, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. Peanuts are legumes, not tree nuts.

According to Dr. John Sievenpiper, a physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael's Hospital, adding nuts to your diet is one simple way of potentially protecting yourself from metabolic disease.

"Fifty grams of nuts can be easily integrated into a diet as a snack or as a substitute for animal fats or refined carbohydrates," Dr. Sievenpiper said.

Source: St. Michael's Hospital

 
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