How to Cope With Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a special case of diabetes that affects pregnant women. It occurs in one of every 25 pregnancies and is characterized by the pregnant woman's body being incapable of producing enough of the chemical insulin to offset the levels of glucose (sugar) in her bloodstream. It is notable because it arises in women who have had no prior history of diabetes. Gestational diabetes typically presents during the second trimester of pregnancy.

Because it is the result of an ongoing biological process (i.e., the growth of a new human being within the mother), gestational diabetes can be difficult to treat. Indeed, in many cases, it cannot be cured, but only managed. Nevertheless, understanding how to cope with gestational diabetes can help an expectant mother get through the pregnancy with minimal impact on her health.

  • Make a Plan

    Work with your doctor to identify your health risks and to devise a comprehensive plan to deal with them. Such a plan might include dietary changes, exercise recommendations, and even medications like supplemental insulin. The key is to stay in control of your blood sugar levels. Making a plan and sticking to it is the best way to ensure you and your baby maintain a healthy lifestyle.

  • Assess Your Eating Habits

    Diet plays a huge role in managing diabetes of any kind. Many expectant mothers have trouble enough finding satisfying, nutritious meals even without having to deal with diabetes concerns. Between cravings, the increased caloric needs of mother and baby, and meeting the nutritional needs of the rest of the family, it can be hard to find meals that work. A professional dietician or nutritionist is trained to help with just these concerns. He or she can work with you or your doctor to tailor a meal plan to your needs, and can take a lot of stress off of you.

  • Consult Your Doctor Regularly

    Your doctor is there to answer your questions and help you feel comfortable with the state of your pregnancy. Take your concerns to him or her and ask what you can do to stay healthy and positive. If your diet or treatment plan doesn't seem to be working, or if it has unexpected side effects (rapid weight loss, depression, etc.), your doctor will be able to make adjustments.

  • Find a Support Group

    Because it is a relatively common condition, there are usually plenty of support options available for mothers with gestational diabetes. Your doctor may be able to help you find one, and if your nutritionist often deals with expectant mothers, he or she may also be able to point you in the right direction. Make sure you try a variety of groups so you find one that works well for you. There are also a number of virtual support groups on the Internet that may be helpful, though many mothers prefer the face-to-face support of a local group also.

  • Stay Positive

    The outcome from gestational diabetes is typically very good. There are many concerns that may arise and need to be dealt with, but with proper advice and a positive, proactive attitude, there is no reason you and your baby shouldn't be just fine.

Conclusion

Diabetes of any kind can have profound effects on your health and lifestyle, and gestational diabetes is no different. But if you know how to cope with gestational diabetes, you'll be better prepared to ask the right questions and deal with it in a positive, effective manner.

Get a Free Diabetes Meal Plan

Get a free 7-Day Diabetes Meal Plan from Constance Brown-Riggs who is a Registered Dietitian-Certified Diabetes Educator and who is also a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Just enter in your email below to download your free Diabetes Meal Plan.

By clicking Submit, you agree to send your info to BattleDiabetes.com who, in addition to 3rd party partners, may contact you with updates, products and information and we agree to use it according to our privacy policy and terms and conditions.

More Articles

More Articles

Scientists have discovered that a single gene forms a common link between type 2 diabetes and...

Natural supplements like cinnamon extract and apple cider vinegar could hold the key to lowering blood sugar levels, according to a recent...

Natural supplements like cinnamon extract and apple cider vinegar could hold the key to lowering blood sugar levels, according to a recent...

Could a person's risk for type 2 diabetes be written in their genes?

According to a study recently published in ...

Women who frequently shift around their sleeping hours could have worse metabolic health outcomes than their peers who stick with a...

The presence of the hormone leptin may hinder prenatal development, which could explain the origin of type 2 diabetes, according to...

An analysis of fossilized Native American feces shows that our ancestors ate up to sixteen times the fiber that we do today, but our...

Managing diabetes is hugely challenging for people of any age, but a new study suggests that young people may suffer all the more....

Disruptions to the gut’s ecosystem could be a future symptom facing young children who take antibiotics, which makes them more susceptible...

Breastfeeding a newborn holds many benefits for mommy and baby; it reduces the baby's risk for colds and viruses, it helps his bones (and yours)...

Fans of the Dexcom G5 Mobile have something to smile about.

At yesterday's hearing with the U.S. Food and Drug...

If you start your day with a cup of tea and end it with a glass of red wine, your blood sugar may thank you.

At least that...

As medical experts continue to debate whether or not "healthy obesity" can even exist, one new study suggests that risk for heart disease...

For years, type 1 diabetics have been anxiously waiting for that medical marvel that can stop the constant injections: the artificial...

“Low-fat” has been the battle cry of the health-conscious for over ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌...