Ways to Reduce Diabetes Risk Factors

Take action to reduce diabetes risk factors

There are many different risk factors that make a person more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. By making changes in lifestyle, it is believed that a person can avoid getting this dreaded disease and the possible complications that it brings with it.

If you are serious about reducing your risk factors, the best way to do this is learn about which of these risk factors apply to you. Finding diabetes information about possible risk factors is the first step to take.

You can greatly reduce or eliminate some of your risk factors

Two of the biggest and most important risk factors of diabetes are a sedentary lifestyle and obesity. These usually go hand in hand because little physical exercise leads often leads to weight gain. Over time, obesity can result. By reducing the time spent sitting in front of a computer or TV and beginning a more active lifestyle, it is possible to lose weight. The sad problem is that losing weight can be difficult. Many people ignore the risk factors of being obese and getting little to no exercise.

Losing weight is usually easiest with support

Many people find that it's easiest to drop extra pounds by joining a health club or gym. They can have the help of a personal trainer who designs an exercise program for them, and if they are devoted and maintain this exercise 5 or 6 days each week, they will lose weight.

Many other programs help people lose weight, including those with pre-made meals or programs that allow you to meet with other dieters. Once a person decides that they really want to reduce their weight, they often succeed. The trick is not to regain the lost pounds. Maintaining an exercise program is usually the key to keep the weight off.

For daily support at no cost, you can join an online support group such as the Diabetes Support Group at SupportGroups.com.

Eating a healthy diet is also extremely important

Many doctors and diabetes specialists tell us that eating a healthy diet is definitely important to reducing diabetes risk factors. Even those who are active and are not overweight need to be aware of how their food choices affect their long term health. A balanced, healthy diet that is primarily fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and little sugar, fat, and processed foods can also reduce the risks of developing high blood pressure, cholesterol irregularities, and other problems.

Modern research continues to show that certain foods and diets can curb high blood glucose levels

Although mainstream medicine continues to use insulin therapy or diabetic medication, alternative medicine and mainstream research studies point to the fact that certain foods lower blood sugar naturally.

Some of these foods are recommended by the American Diabetes Association as well, like beans, lentils, and other legumes. The Peanut Institute.org reminds us of a 2002 study in which peanuts, another legume, were shown to reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Nurses who ate peanut butter five or more times a week reduced their risk of getting the disease by 25 percent. Some studies also show that coffee reduces diabetes. According to researchers in Finland, a 2004 study indicated that coffee reduces the risk of developing diabetes.

Get a Free Diabetes Meal Plan

Get a free 7-Day Diabetes Meal Plan from Constance Brown-Riggs who is a Registered Dietitian-Certified Diabetes Educator and who is also a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

Just enter in your email below to download your free Diabetes Meal Plan.

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